The Coastal Post - February, 1996

What You Should Know About H.R. 2768

1) allows both state and federal prosecutors to obtain a list of the telephone numbers your telephone and fax machine calls and receives, even though nobody thinks that you are guilty of any crime.

2) allows the Attorney General to secretly obtain your financial records, without a warrant, even though nobody thinks that you are guilty of any crime.

3) allows the government to secretly obtain your hotel/motel bills, vehicle rental records, public storage records and your shipping invoices when you use a private shipping company even though nobody thinks that you are guilty of any crime.

4) authorizes preliminary studies in preparation for the new chemical weapons convention (treaty) that gives U.N. inspectors police powers and immunity from prosecution for criminal acts (even murder) committed on United States soil.

5) further weakens the exclusionary rule that has protected Americans for generations against an over-reaching, over-bearing government

6) opens the floodgates for warrantless interception of your e-mail and internet communications and for warrantless electronic interception of your financial records.

7) seriously erodes the ability of a court to supervise and contain the scope of a legal wiretap or your phone and/or fax machine.

8) allows the FBI to secretly, without a warrant, obtain a list of your local and long-distance toll billing records even though nobody thinks that you are guilty of any crime.

9) puts extra record-keeping requirements on your local and long distance carriers and other electronics communications service providers (i.e., internet, e-mail, etc.) so that your records will be available for seizure with or without a warrant, even though nobody thinks that you are guilty of any crime.

10) extends the length of time that you may be held as custody before you are taken before a judge.

11) allows the Attorney General to reward off-duty police who turn in their neighbors.

12) allows the Attorney General to prohibit people from doing business in buildings adjacent to federal buildings.

13) allows the Attorney General to carry on a continuing investigation on military bases and arsenals even though the military are outside of her jurisdiction.