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MARIN COUNTY'S NEWS MONTHLY - FREE PRESS
(415)868-1600 - (415)868-0502(fax) - P.O. Box 31, Bolinas, CA, 94924

October, 2006

Connecting The Dots
Dazed And Confused
By Larry Kelley


"We make peace with our enemies, not our friends."
-Madeleine Albright, former Secretary of State

I'm so confused. All these years I thought war was a bad thing and peace was good. But now the president of the world's greatest country tells me I'm wrong, along with most of the rest of the world. And not just confused but "morally and intellectually confused." Meaning our president thinks it is more moral and more intelligent to kill than not to kill. Welcome to Animal Farm.
George and Dick never went to war themselves but they seem to be the only people left in the world who think this invasion of Iraq is a good thing. I'm confused all right. Confused as to how anyone can believe any of the many reasons given for our bombing, invasion, destruction and mass murder in Iraq.

Bush said there were weapons of mass destruction and some vague connection to 9/11 and terrorist groups and recently he told Wolf Blitzer of CNN that Saddam was viewed as "a threat," and didn't like us, despite having been best of friends with the first Bush administration in the '80's.

In an attempt to clear up this confusion, former president Bill Clinton recently told CNN's Larry King that Cheney and Bush "had made their minds up in advance" that invading Iraq "was the thing to do."

Speaking of Cheney, Clinton said, "the evidence is made clear now that he and the other proponents of the Iraq War did not care whether he (Saddam) had weapons of mass destruction, did not care whether he was involved in 9/11, did not care whether the evidence showed any of this or not. They had made their minds up in advance…"

Clinton's Global Initiative Conference somehow managed to upstage the verbal festivities going on at the United Nations General Assembly meeting where name-calling by Venezuela's president Hugo Chavez was matched only by Bush's abrasive hypocrisy.

First, Clinton teamed up with Laura Bush to announce a Global Initiative effort "to bring clean drinking water to 10 million people in Africa."

"Half of the world lives on less than $2 a day," Clinton said at a press conference in New York. "And a billion people in the world never get a clean drink of water."

The next day Clinton dropped a bombshell [sorry] with the announcement that British entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson would contribute $3 billion over the next 10 years to fight global warming. The founder and chairman of Virgin Group said he would take the money from the profits of his transportation companies, including Virgin Air.

The Global Initiative addresses four major areas: climate change, health challenges, religious and ethnic conflicts and poverty.

* * *
While Clinton brought back memories of a peaceful country and a booming economy, handing Bush a $1 trillion surplus, our "war president" had this to say to the United Nations:

"The greatest obstacle to the future is that your rulers have chosen to deny you liberty and to use your nations' resources to fund terrorism and fuel extremism and pursue nuclear weapons." He apparently didn't realize how closely the words fit him but the 15 seconds of applause he received must have given him some cause for chagrin.

The next day Chavez told the UN, "Yesterday the devil ["el Diablo] was here. Right here," [He makes the sign of the cross.] "talking as if he owned the world. And it smells of sulfur still today." The next day, at a church in Harlem, he called Bush "a sick man," an "ex-alcoholic" and "a swaggering cowboy." CNN retaliated by calling Chavez "El Loco" and "The mouth of the south." Journalism at its best.

While Bush was warning the UN about countries that pursue nuclear weapons, ten Nobel Peace Prize winners met with 7,000 young Americans at the University of Denver where they called on the US to "stop trying" to force democracy on other countries by using "the barrel of a gun." The International Nobel Lauriat Seminar criticized the US for having 28,000 nuclear bombs.

* * *
Another thing that has me confused is this so-called "hunt for Osama." A few months ago, Bush told newsman Fred Barnes that he "really didn't care" if Osama was captured and "rarely thought of him." Soon after, he again was talking tough, telling CNN he would get Osama "no matter how long it takes."

Can anyone imagine the board meeting of the Carlyle Group, including the Bush and Bin Laden families, where Mr. Bush Sr. announces as the first item on the agenda, "We're very sorry Mr. Bin Laden, but we had to kill your son Osama. Carl Rove said you wouldn't mind."

And Bush Jr. recently told Wolf Blitzer he would invade Pakistan, supposedly our friend and ally, without asking if he had information that Bin Laden was there. Since Pakistan is a sovereign nation, its president Pervez Musharraf wasn't thrilled by this idea. "We would do it ourselves," he said. But at a joint press conference with Musharraf, Bush said they were "on the same page." Again, I'm confused.

And things got worse when Musharraf mentioned that shortly after 9/11, he was told by the US that his country would be "bombed back to the stone age" if he didn't cooperate with the Bush administration.

When asked about all this at the press conference with Bush, Musharraf said he couldn't say anything because he has a book coming out and the publisher "wants me to keep quiet." Who's the publisher, el Diablo?

* * *
In case there isn't enough confusion about electronic voting machines, a Princeton professor recently revealed that he and two grad students were able to install a computer virus in a touch-screen e-voting machine which stole votes undetected by modifying all records, logs and counters to be consistent with the fraudulent vote count it creates.

Edward Felton, a professor of computer science and public affairs, claims he can install the malicious code on the machine's memory in less than a minute, reports Marianne McGee on Information Week. In the fall election, 66.6 million voters are expected to use e-voting equipment, according to the consulting firm Election Data Services.

There are lots of other things I'm confused about, like why planes weren't scrambled on 9/11; and why friends and family of the alleged perp were secretly whisked out of the country on the only plane allowed to fly; and how a building blocks away from the twin towers collapsed even though it hadn't been hit; and why there is no sign of a plane at the Pentagon site and the Pennsylvania farmland site. I'd like answers to all of this and more. Please Mr. Popularity, let us know. End the confusion.



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